Notes for Eli Alfred SELF


Alfred and Martha Ann lived in Sabine Parish Louisiana. They had nine chil dren
of which six were born in Louisiana. Around 1878, Alfred and Martha A nn moved
their family to Rusk County, Texas.  Alfred and Martha Ann stay ed in Texas
for a few years. They had another daughter born to them in Tex as. One son by
Alfred's first wife, Minerva, died in Rusk County, Texas, a nd two of his and
Martha Ann's daughters died there. In the Fall of 188 1, Alfred and Martha Ann
moved to the Creek Nation, Indian Territory, a nd settled near Eufaula.[family
ties 1B.FTW]

Alfred and Martha Ann lived in Sabine Parish Louisiana. They had nine chil
dren of which six were born in Louisiana. Around 1878, Alfred and Martha A nn
moved their family to Rusk County, Texas.  Alfred and Martha Ann stay ed in
Texas for a few years. They had another daughter born to them in Tex as. One
son by Alfred's first wife, Minerva, died in Rusk County, Texas, a nd two of
his and Martha Ann's daughters died there. In the Fall of 188 1, Alfred and
Martha Ann moved to the Creek Nation, Indian Territory, a nd settled near
Eufaula.
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Notes for George Mitchell "Mitt" SELF


In September of 1880 in Texas, "Mitt" was out herding cattle when his hor se
tripped and fell on him.  He died of his injuries in Rusk County, a new lywed
and only eighteen years old.[family ties 1B.FTW]

In September of 1880 in Texas, "Mitt" was out herding cattle when his hor se
tripped and fell on him.  He died of his injuries in Rusk County, a new lywed
and only eighteen years old.
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Notes for Harriet SELF


Indian Pioneer History Project for Oklahoma
Name: Harriet Self Spring
Post Office: Britton, Oklahoma
Date of Birth: 1866
Place of Birth: nine miles north of Honey Grove, TX at Self, TX
Father: Wm. Carrol Self
Place of Birth: Alabama
Mother: Mary Caroline Baxter Self
Place of birth: Georgia

Pa and the boys had come over here in the Spring of 1882 to build hous es on
the ranch where we were to live and to have everything comfortable f or Ma and
us girls before we came over in the fall. They build our big fou r-room plank
house with a hall, almost as big as each from room, all the w ay between the
four rooms. The back rooms were just what we called shed ro oms. One was used
for a kitchen, the other for a bedroom and the hall f or a dining room. There
were so many of us and hired hands, too, all the t ime. There were Pa and Ma,
and eight of us children then. It took a big ta ble to accommodate all of us. 
Other children were born there.

Our house was out of the prairie one mile north of Longview Post Office, w
hich was in the home of George Oakes; that old house is still standing thr ee
miles east of the present town of Hugo. It was made of planks, too, a nd I
just can’t think where they got planks to build houses with here in 1 882. I
guess there must have been some sawmills somewhere in the country.

A lot of the fencing was of rocks that were picked up on the banks of t he
Salt Creek which was only a little ways from our ranch home. We had a l ot of
rail fencing, too. The rails were made down on the creek.

Willie Spring had got acquainted with Pa and the boys when they came ov er in
the Spring. He used to come over and spend nights with them. Then wh en we
came here in the fall we had a big “house warming” and dance; everyb ody in
the country was there including him. But he was so bashful th at he pretended
not to notice me. He would come on Sundays and prete nd to be visiting the
boys.  Then once when we went to Spring Chapel to ch urch, the got one of the
other boys to ask me if he could have my compa ny home. I said “yes” and
waited for him to come around for me. Finally t he crowd came in and asked why
I didn’t come on. They had been out the re on their horses. I told them I was
waiting for Willie to come for me. T hen I found out that he had gone home to
saddle his horse and would jo in us as we went past their place about a
half-mile east of the churc h; he had been too timid to tell me that. Well, he
rode with me but was su ch a “Tubby” that I had to do all the talking.

Soon after that he sat around our house a half day before the got the cour age
to ask me to go to a dance with him. Then when we wanted to get marri ed he
got his uncle, Jim Spring, to ask Pa for me. Uncle Jim was sheri ff of the
county and when he rode up to our house Ma, Sister Nannie a nd I were
quilting.

Ma just wondered and puzzled over why the sheriff came and asked for P a. He
was down on the creek making rails and Ma blew the horn for him to c ome to
the house but she didn’t ask Uncle Jim what he wanted. Women tho se days
didn’t ask anything about their husband’s business. Ma never kn ew where here
bunch of cowhands were going when they rode off in the morni ng unless they
were going so far that they would need lunch or a chuck wag on. But I knew
what Uncle Jim wanted and right away I asked Nann ie to go to the spring with
me after some water. Ma told us to try and g et the quilt out before sundown,
that there was plenty of water up for t he night. I insisted that I wanted a
fresh drink, and I sure did becau se I was so excited my mouth and throat were
dry. We went to the spring a nd tried to stay until Uncle Jim would be gone
but we couldn’t, he stay ed so long.

We went back to the house and found Ma crying. Nannie asked her what was t he
matter and she said, “I told Bill when he wanted to move over here th at some
of our children would marry Indians”. And sure enough we did. S ix out of the
ten of us married Choctaw Indians. I married Willie Sprin g, Nannie married
his brother Basil, Tom married Annie Usray, Dave marri ed a full blood Choctaw
girl, Ellie Fisher. Our adopted brother, Bill Russ ell, married Emma Usray,
and our youngest brother Doss, married Sarah Spri ng. Dock, George, and Frank
married white girls, and Walter was kill ed at sixteen.

I was seventeen in February and March 24, 1883, I was married to Willie Sp
ring.  Old Parson Miller, a full blood Choctaw Indian minister up fr om on
Long Creek, officiated at the home of my father. Nearly everybo dy in the
country was there. Mary and Tom Hibbin, Lem and Lucy Oakes, B ob Alison who
married a missionary at Goodland and Elizabeth Reed. Ben Sne ad was there and
Oh! so many others. The house and yard were full.

The began dancing at dark and danced all night, until the sun was shini ng the
next morning; then they all went home. I didn’t dance; I hadn’t dan ced since
I was baptized but my husband danced three sets and my daddy dan ced three
sets.  Willie was fiddler and had to “spell” Doc Everidge eve ry once in a
while. Doc was the fiddler for the occasion but he would g et tired and have
to rest.

We had supper at midnight. It had taken two Long Creek Negroes and their w
ives a whole day to cook and bake for that supper. Pa always had lots of s
heep so he had one barbecued and a couple of big hams baked. One ham w as a
fresh one and one was cured. Then there were stacks of custard and cr ust
pies, a half dozen stacked on each plate and, I guess, there were a do zen
plates of those pies scattered all along that long table of Pa’s. It w as not
long enough and we added the long cook table from the kitchen. The re were
numbers of cakes on that table besides the pickles and relishes. T here was a
haunch of venison in the middle of the table, it had been barbe cued too.

Nobody sat down to eat. Everybody got a plate and got whatever he or she w
anted as they passed the table. Some stood around the table but they we re all
over the place. Coffee was made in big old two gallon pots and t ea kettles
and was served all night long.

The Negroes washed the dishes and sliced the meats, cakes and pies befo re
going to the table and then everything was left on the table so gues ts could
go in and “snack” when they got ready. Coffee was hot and ready a ll night. So
much for our wedding. We lived forty five years and had fourt een children,
then of whom are living. My husband was a good fiddler and p layed for dances
all over the country for years and years. For forty year s, I guess, and when
he got older he was called “Uncle Willie”. He di ed in 1927.

Of course every girl wore home knit woolen stockings then when the weath er
was cold. It was in March when we were married and I had on mine. Wh en we got
over to Willie’s father’s house I discovered that he had on th in cotton
socks. I was so afraid that his feet would freeze that I went ba ck to Pa’s
and got some wool and carded, spun and knitted him a coup le of pairs of socks
within the week. His folks thought that was wonderfu l. They were just
“Tubbies” and didn’t do anything that they could get o ut of doing. They
didn’t even piece quilts or pick geese and ducks to ma ke feather beds or milk
a cow. They had worlds of cattle and a store, so t hey always just bought
blankets and made comforts for covers.

I had been raised to work and make everything that we used. We girls knitt ed
our own stockings and made our own quilts and clothes. We had picked ge ese
and ducks and made feather beds and pillows for ourselves and ea ch of the
boys.

Willie and I moved into a little house out by the lots there at his father ’s. 
I told the boys that they would pen some of those cows I would milk t hem.
They penned several and it was not long before we had plenty of mi lk and
butter.  They boys had to help me for a while because we had to t ie some of
the cows by their horns and had to tie their legs together a nd stand by with
sticks, too, sometimes, but I soon got them broke and ke pt cows in the pen
from then on.

There was a house full of “Uncle Billy” children and they didn’t work. Man ny,
my husband’s mother, was a Leflore and they had always had slaves to w ait
upon them. She didn’t know how to work or to teach her girls to work a nd they
never did learn either. I had quilts that I had made at home and M anny
admired them, so she bought goods and I pieced and quilted quilts f or her.
Uncle Billy had a store there at the place so it was easy for h er to get
pretty bright colored pieces. I carded the cotton to pad them wi th.

After I moved away from there and was on a place of our own I got a flo ck of
geese and went to making feather beds and pillows for my fast increa sing
family. I sold a few feathers along. I got 50c a pound all the tim e. We never
saved any kind but geese or duck feathers. The feather money a nd the wool
money always was the pin money for the woman of the family. Th at was
understood. She even had to pay for the shearing of the sheep wi th her “wool
money”. My mother furnished her home with her wool, feathe r, and egg money. I
heard her say once that she was married forty years be fore my father bought
her a dress, she had plenty of clothes, too, nice on es.

Ma smoked a pipe. My father’s mother was blind for seventeen years and s he
would have us to light her pipe by getting coals of fire out of the fir
eplace, then we would have to get it going for her. Ma and I both got t he
smoking habit. She always had those little clay or stone pipes. I sti ll have
my mother’s little old pipe and smoke it until I broke the stem t he other
day.  Every day at ten o’clock Ma smoked. She sat down and smok ed for one
hour and read. I mattered not what there was to do. Ma smoked a nd read for
one hour each morning, beginning at ten o’clock. She arrang ed her work just
that way.  One funny thing was that Ma had false teen a nd never wore them at
home. She said they bothered her, so when she wou ld go to church on Sunday
she would smoke on the way over while she cou ld have her teeth out. Then she
would have to have some of us girls go do wn in the bushes with her short
after dinner smoke. She went to the bush es when she could take out her teeth.
She said she could not hold her pi pe with them. We would take big baskets of
good things to church and st ay and have dinner on the ground, whatever was
left we snacked on it for s upper and stayed for night services. Some of the
boys would be sent ho me to feed the stock, then they would come back.

Here I want to mention the reason that “Granny” always had us to light h er
pipe with coal of fire was to save matches. We saved everything then. W
rapping paper was carefully cut in strips and rolled into a spiral, then f
lattened and the end turned down to hold it; a whole vase full was alwa ys to
be found on the mantles of nearly every home and they were used to l ight
lamps and sometimes pipes, but nearly everybody lighted the pipe wi th coals
of fire. So carefully conserving things was perhaps one reason w hy we needed
so little money. We made and saved so much at home.

Submitted to OKGenWeb by Jami Hamilton  02-1999.
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Notes for James Buchannon SELF


He along with his family removed to the Creek Nation before 1891.[family t ies
1B.FTW]

He along with his family removed to the Creek Nation before 1891.
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Notes for James M. SELF


Source: RootsWeb.com Isearch-cgi 1.20.06 (File: beryh10.txt) Submitt ed by
David Morgan dmorgan@@efn.org
James M. Self was born in Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana, in October 184 3. He
was the ninth and last child born to John and Catherine T. (Berryhil l) Self.
When James was about twelve years old he went with his paren ts to the Creek
Nation for the Old Settlers Creek Payments. He was in Po lk County, Texas,
with his parents in 1860. James M. Self returned to Loui siana before 1862 and
married Mary A. Weldon in Sabine Parish, Louisian a, 13 December 1862. James
and Mary settled in Sabine Parish after their m arriage and raised their
children there. I believe they lived the re st of their lives there. Both were
still living in 1910.[family ties 1B.FT W]

Source: RootsWeb.com Isearch-cgi 1.20.06 (File: beryh10.txt) Submitt ed by
David Morgan dmorgan@@efn.org
James M. Self was born in Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana, in October 184 3. He
was the ninth and last child born to John and Catherine T. (Berryhil l) Self.
When James was about twelve years old he went with his paren ts to the Creek
Nation for the Old Settlers Creek Payments. He was in Po lk County, Texas,
with his parents in 1860. James M. Self returned to Loui siana before 1862 and
married Mary A. Weldon in Sabine Parish, Louisian a, 13 December 1862. James
and Mary settled in Sabine Parish after their m arriage and raised their
children there. I believe they lived the re st of their lives there. Both were
still living in 1910.
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Notes for John SELF


The United States Indian Department     No. 7
To John Self

1827 To services of one wagon, four horses and
     one teamster, employed in transporting
     baggage for Creek Emigrants, 13 days
     furnishing forage for the horses at $4.00
     per day...                                        52.00

1827 To furnishing rations for 6 Persons for
     30 days commencing in March and ending in
     April 1827, being 180 rations at 6 cents
     per ration...                                10.80

1827 To 40 days work on board a flat boat at
     75 cents per day                                  30.00

1827 To one horse stolen valued by Capt. Walker
     at $50                                       50.00
                                             _______
                                             $142.80

I do hereby certify upon my word and honor that the foregoing account amou
nting to $142.80 is justly due me from the United States and that I have n
ever received payment for the same or any part thereof.
     Given at the Creek Agency this tenth day of December, 1834.

Witness                                           his
John Wade                               John X Self
                                              mark
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Notes for John Berryhill SELF


John B. Self

To the National Council                          Okmulkee I. T.
of the Muscogee Nation                             Oct. 6 1891

Gentlemen:

The undersigned, your petitioner prays your attention and early acti on on the
claims of himself and others represented by him, to the rights
and privileges of a Creek Citizen arising and due to them as they belie ve
under the following facts to wit:

In the early emigration of the Creeks to this country -probably ;-n abo ut
1823,-John-and Elizabeth Martha Berrvhill and their daughter Susan my m other,
being then recognized members of the Creek Nation of Indians remo ve along
with the said Creeks, and with them settled on the Arkansas riv er some where
near 3 miles above the mouth of the Verdigris river in th is Nation.  Here we
lived for the period of about nine (9) years at the e nd of which time your
petitioner was about eleven (11) years of age.  My p arents for some cause
no,. known to me, and at a time when I could not, be cause of my tender:- age,
make a legal objection even had I been so dispos ed, against leaving my
Nation, moved from the Territory with me to the sta tes where I became of age,
and where my social and property interests ha ve forced me to reside until the
present time. 1 claim rights as a Creek t hrough my maternal descent.  My
mother's maiden name was, -as above indica ted Susan Berryhill. and was the
full sister of John, Alex and Pleasant Be rrvhill, who are all well known to
the older Citizens of this Natio n.  My children for whom I also speak, and
whom.-- 1 include-in this petit ion are named respectively : Samantha E.
Newton, Mary Harwell, Willi am B. Self, Sonora V. Chester, J. B. Self, jr. ,
Sallie F.. Alexander, Mar tha F. Boling and James -R.  Self aid their several
respective descendant s. Mr.  E. A. Self, a near relative, occupied before the
National precise ly the position I now do, and was very justly as we believe,
recogniz ed as a Citizen and accorded all the rights and privileges thereto
belongi ng.

It does not appear that my cause require at your hands an act of adopti on
since it is well known that my mother came to this country,and as alrea dy
stated, lived with the people in this her own Nation for about the peri od of
nine years before moving to the States.  Having once been a full cit izen, and
so recognized, her subsequent domicile in a neighboring state co uld' not
operate to vitiate the rights and privileges she originally posse ssed. - 1
'beg, however that you take such early steps as will promise a s peedy
investigation of my claim, and secure to me and my descendants the right and
privileges I believe to be justly d ue us, and for this I will ever pray.

Your Obedient Servant.
J. B. Self.  Ser.

Source: David W. Morgan
John Self Testimony for his brother William B. Self

After being sworn.  My name is John Self.
Do you know Wm.  B. Self ?
Yes sir.
Is one of his children in this room ?
Yes, this is Mrs. Herrick.  This one is Middleton T. Self, one of his daug
hters is living in Checotah, one is at Mr. Lynches and one is in Texas.  T his
is the name of the one living in Checotah; Helen.
Is that her first name ?
Yes that is her first name.
Do you know Louisa Leath ?
Yes sir, she is living in Texas.
Who is Dolly Lynch ?
She is Buck's daughter, a sister to these others.
Where does Dolly Lynch live ?
She lives in the edge of town.
In whose behalf are you testifying ?
I suppose I was testifying in behalf of the Plaintiffs, the applicants.
Who is the father of Mary Herrick ?
Buck Self.
How many daughters has Buck Self ?
He has Mary, Helen, Dolly and Louisa.
Where were they born ?
In Texas.
There is a Buck Self jr., who is he ?
He had a son to die here last winter and his little son is here.
At Lynches?
I suppose that is the one.
Where was Buck Self jrs father born ?
He was born in Texas.
Do you know about what time these applicants came to this Nation ?
No sir, I do not.  I will state this, however, they have been in this Nati on
and the Choctaw Nation for quite a good many years.
You said that they came to the Choctaw Nation ? How long ago has that be en ?
I stated that I did not know.  I did not live near them and don't know wh en
they moved.
Did you say that Louisa never did Live here ?
No, she has been here and lived.  She is living in Texas now.
Was  Mary Herrick's mother a white woman ?
She is a white woman or regarded as such.
Where is Mary Herrick's father ?
He is Buck Self, an Indian.
Was he lately admitted to citizenship ?
Yes sir.
How- much Indian blood has Buck Self ? According to the blood of one fore-
fathers he has about 1/4.


TULSA ANNALS, VOL.  XXIII, No. 3, Spring, 19
      131
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Notes for John Clarke SELF


John C. Self grew up in Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana. Sometime after 185 0,
he went to Rusk County, Texas, to visit his uncle William Berryhill, w ho had
moved to Rusk County, Texas, from Tallapoosa County, Alabama. Jo hn married
his first cousin, America M. Sophronia Berryhill.

America was born in Randolph County, Alabama, in 1836. Her parents were Wi
lliam and Elizabeth Nixon-Berryhill. Her father was a brother to John Cla rk
Self's mother, Catherine (Berryhill) Self. Nathan Berryhill, who gave s
tatements in the Creek Nation for the Self and Berryhill cousins, was Amer
ica's brother.

Georgianna Berryhill-Wills was a sister to America. On some papers s he is
referred to as "America" and on some "Sophronia". She also had a cou sin,
Clarinda Sophronia Berryhill-Self, who had married John Clarke Self 's
brother, Samuel C. Self. Clarinda was also sometimes called "Sophronia ". This
can be confusing on the Creek Indian records.[family ties 1B.FTW]

John C. Self grew up in Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana. Sometime after 185 0,
he went to Rusk County, Texas, to visit his uncle William Berryhill, w ho had
moved to Rusk County, Texas, from Tallapoosa County, Alabama. Jo hn married
his first cousin, America M. Sophronia Berryhill.

America was born in Randolph County, Alabama, in 1836. Her parents were Wi
lliam and Elizabeth Nixon-Berryhill. Her father was a brother to John Cla rk
Self's mother, Catherine (Berryhill) Self. Nathan Berryhill, who gave s
tatements in the Creek Nation for the Self and Berryhill cousins, was Amer
ica's brother.

Georgianna Berryhill-Wills was a sister to America. On some papers s he is
referred to as "America" and on some "Sophronia". She also had a cou sin,
Clarinda Sophronia Berryhill-Self, who had married John Clarke Self 's
brother, Samuel C. Self. Clarinda was also sometimes called "Sophronia ". This
can be confusing on the Creek Indian records.
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Notes for Lillions Irene SELF


Lilly was granted citizenship in the Creek Nation[family ties 1B.FTW]

Lilly was granted citizenship in the Creek Nation
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Notes for Martha Ann SELF


Source for this line towards present: Michael Gilcrease, http://worldconne
ct.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:536604&id=I073 [family ties 1B.
FTW]

Source for this line towards present: Michael Gilcrease, http://worldconne
ct.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:536604&id=I073
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Notes for Martha Ann "Mattie" SELF


Card No. 782 21 Aug 1899
Dawes     Name      age  sex  DIB  Father         Mother
No.
2539 Murray, Martha 46   F    1/8  Eli A. Self         Minerva
2540 Jesse     son  13   M    1/16 A. J. Murray   No. 1
2541 Ada  dau  11   F    1/8  A. J. Murray   No. 1
2542 Clarence Lee son     8   M    1/16 A. J. Murray   No. 1[family ties 1
B.FTW]

Card No. 782 21 Aug 1899
Dawes     Name      age  sex  DIB  Father         Mother
No.
2539 Murray, Martha 46   F    1/8  Eli A. Self         Minerva
2540 Jesse     son  13   M    1/16 A. J. Murray   No. 1
2541 Ada  dau  11   F    1/8  A. J. Murray   No. 1
2542 Clarence Lee son     8   M    1/16 A. J. Murray   No. 1
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Notes for Mary Jane SELF


Card No. 1811  16 April 1900
Dawes     Name      age  sex  DIB  Father         Mother
No.
5759 Self, Mary Jane     48   F    1/8  E. A. Self          Minerva
5760 Callie M. dau  17   F    3/16 Thomas J. Self No. 1
5761 Hommer J. son  13   M    3/16 Thomas J. Self No. 1
5762 Roxanna   dau  12   F    3/16 Thomas J. Self No. 1
5763 Katie     dau   7   F    3/16 Thomas J. Self No. 1[family ties 1B.FTW ]

Card No. 1811  16 April 1900
Dawes     Name      age  sex  DIB  Father         Mother
No.
5759 Self, Mary Jane     48   F    1/8  E. A. Self          Minerva
5760 Callie M. dau  17   F    3/16 Thomas J. Self No. 1
5761 Hommer J. son  13   M    3/16 Thomas J. Self No. 1
5762 Roxanna   dau  12   F    3/16 Thomas J. Self No. 1
5763 Katie     dau   7   F    3/16 Thomas J. Self No. 1
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Notes for Presley SELF


unsure of his relationship to William Self, could be uncle rather than bro ther.
Return to Presley SELF